Cadet Summer Training

Medics keep Cadets Safe Throughout CST

FORT KNOX, Ky. – Cadet Summer Training is wrapping up in a few weeks and thanks to a special group of Soldiers that are here to make it go as smoothly as possible it has been a huge success.

The medics are here are from all over the country with more than 110 medics here for the training. Their job is to keep Cadets safe and help them with any medical needs that might come up.

Sgt. Alan Lamore, with the 61st Medical Battalion, 1st Medical Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas, said his team has provided many services to the Cadets this summer.

“We treat the injuries that they (Cadets) sustain day to day and we also hold sick calls for issues that are not so immediate,” he said. “The good thing about medics is that we can usually deal with issues at the lowest level so that it doesn’t become a bigger issue.”

Cdt. Chelsea Menser, South Dakota State University, talks with Spc. Johnathan Tso, Ft. Carson, Co., to receive continued medical care while she attends Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) at Fort Knox, Ky., Aug. 5.Photo by: Trent Taylor

Cdt. Chelsea Menser, South Dakota State University, talks with Spc. Johnathan Tso, Ft. Carson, Co., to receive continued medical care while she attends Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) at Fort Knox, Ky., Aug. 5.Photo by: Trent Taylor

Lamore is a Noncommissioned Officer In Charge (NCOIC) of one of the medical clinics stations and was also a regimental medic earlier in the summer. He said keeping Cadets in the training is what is most important to the medics.

Sgt. Davide Preston, with the 2nd Brigade, 1st Calvary Division, Fort Hood, Texas, is a committee medic for CST. He said the committee medics have had an integral role in the Cadets completing their training safely.

“My job as a committee medic we are assigned to specific training areas. We know the ins and outs, the evacuation routes, and the choke points, or where is the most common spot in our area that Cadets might get hurt.”

With all the different training going on, it is beneficial to have both types of medics – the regimental medics that know the Cadets and work with them, and the committee medics that know the specific training and what to look for.

“We are here to do three things – one, to educate and prevent injuries for example stretching, and preventing heat related injuries. Two, we are here to be on the sight of an injury in case something does happen and get them to the next level of care. Third, we do a sick call time where the Cadets can come in for the minor things such as bumps, bruises, and runny noses,” Preston explained.

With the temperatures as high as they have been this summer, the prevention of heat related injuries has been a big point of emphasis. This has allowed the medics to also get to have some real world experience.

Spc. Taylor Hylinski, Ft. Carson, Co., helps Cdt. Arlenys Medina, City College of New York, after Medina hurt her ankle during training with Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) at Fort Knox, Ky., Aug. 5.Photo by: Trent Taylor

Spc. Taylor Hylinski, Ft. Carson, Co., helps Cdt. Arlenys Medina, City College of New York, after Medina hurt her ankle during training with Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) at Fort Knox, Ky., Aug. 5.Photo by: Trent Taylor

“We keep the Cadets in the fight longer, but we also get hands-on training in a real world situation – day in and day out, it doesn’t just keep me up on my skills, but also to teach my Soldiers all the different things they might run into,” Preston commented.

There is also a dual purpose to the importance of the medics. Col. Jenifer Meno, Task Force Medical Commander for CST on Fort Knox, said exposure to medical personnel also prepares Cadets for dealings with them in a real world situation.

“These (Cadets) will be our future leaders, they need to learn how the medical system works so if they get injured they know how the process works,” she said.

She said building confidence is another big goal of Cadet Summer Training.

“We want them to have confidence in our ability to take care of them when they are in the field,” Meno added.

The medical personnel who are here to assist with Cadet Summer Training only want what’s best for the Cadets. They are with the Cadets 24/7 to ensure their safety, help them learn the process, and build confidence. Even though sometimes they can go unnoticed, they play and extremely vital role to the Cadets training.

      

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Trent Taylor

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