Cadet Summer Training

Cadet reflects visit with the 102nd Regiment of the Republic of Korea

102nd ROK REGIMENTAL VISIT

by Caitlin Skalicky

Cadets pose with the 102nd Regiment ROK commander Kang, Jung Duk in front of the headquarters building.

Cadets pose with the 102nd Regiment ROK commander Kang, Jung Duk in front of the headquarters building.

The cadets of team 2 Korea visited the 102nd ROK Regiment of the 17th Infantry Division on June 23 in order to build relations and familiarize themselves with ROK military units. Cadets were welcomed by the Regimental Commander Kang, Jung Duk and were introduced to the mission of the 17th Infantry Division through a film and discussion. Cadets were given an opportunity for some professional development when they sat down for a round table discussion with ROK officers. The Cadets and officers exchanged questions and answers about leadership challenges and the differences and similarities between the United States and Korean militaries.

Cadet Kevin Moon, from Johns Hopkins University, practicing his firing position and poise, trying not to make the white rock being placed on his weapon to fall.

Cadet Kevin Moon, from Johns Hopkins University, practicing his firing position and poise, trying not to make the white rock being placed on his weapon to fall.

After lunch, cadets were taken to one of the unit’s firing ranges to participate in Primary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI). The instruction began with steady positioning, trigger pull, sight picture and body positioning. The cadets were tested along with ROK soldiers by placing a rock on the end of the barrel while the soldier or cadet pulled the trigger. They were given five tries to pull the trigger without letting the rock fall off the end of the barrel.

Cadet Eunjin Lee, from University of Southern California, throwing a grenade with the 102nd ROK Regiment in training exercises.

Cadet Eunjin Lee, from University of Southern California, throwing a grenade with the 102nd ROK Regiment in training exercises.

Next cadets were taken to an area where soldiers were learning proper posturing of how to go from standing to prone position. Cadets were taught the four steps to proper posturing and then put through a competition to see who did it the best. The final training cadets were put through was the fundamentals of throwing a hand grenade. Cadets were able to practice by throwing two simulation grenades each. In conclusion, cadets were able to expand their cultural and domain knowledge through exceptional training and discussions.

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